Trackpad Disabled After Sleep/Suspend Following Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

As you may have guessed by my previous article, I recently upgraded to Ubuntu 20.04. Since the upgrade, I’ve had an issue where my laptop’s trackpad is disabled until I reboot–which is very annoying.

Today I set out to tackle the problem and found that this has been a recurring problem since at least 16.04, and it actually seems more surprising that I haven’t seen the issue until now! Luckily, there’s an easy solution.

I’m using a T440s, and this article about fixing the trackpad on a T450s was perfect. In this article, I’ll walk through my steps for confirming and fixing the issue.

First, I wanted to assert that I could reproduce the problem by performing the following steps:

  1. Reboot
  2. Confirm trackpad works
  3. Close laptop lid
  4. Open laptop lid
  5. Confirm trackpad is no longer working

Next, per the referenced article, I ran the following two commands to verify that they would re-enable a disabled trackpad:

$ sudo modprobe -r psmouse
$ sudo modprobe psmouse

Yay it worked! So, now I could put the permanent solution into place. I modified /etc/default/grub so that the GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT property included psmouse.synaptics_intertouch=0, then ran update-grub. These two tasks can be accomplished by running the following:

$ sudo sed -i 's/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="\(.*\)"/GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="\1 psmouse.synaptics_intertouch=0"/g' /etc/default/grub
$ sudo update-grub

That’s it! I rebooted, repeated my repro steps, and confirmed that the trackpad was no longer disabled. Wonderful!

Upgrade to Ubuntu 20.04

Image by rockiger from Pixabay

The newest LTS version of Ubuntu is scheduled to release on April 23. Once it’s released, upgrading is as easy as running a few commands. In this article, we’ll walk through the process of updating the current system and then performing the upgrade.

Before you upgrade, make sure your system is as up to date as possible. Do this by running the follwing commands:

sudo apt update 
sudo apt upgrade
sudo apt dist-upgrade
sudo apt autoremove

Now that you’ve confirmed you’re up to date, it’s time to do the upgrade.

sudo apt install update-manager-core
sudo do-release-upgrade

If you receive a No new release found message, it means the upgrade hasn’t been made available to you. It’s been noted that the upgrade path from 19.10 will not be enabled until a few days after release, and the upgrade from 18.04 LTS will not be enabled until a few days after the 20.04.1 release expected in late July. However, you can force the upgrade at your own risk by using the -d flag.

sudo do-release-upgrade -d