Using jQuery to directly call ASP.NET AJAX page methods | Encosia

Using jQuery to directly call ASP.NET AJAX page methods | Encosia.

An old favorite!

Where my squiggles at?

Somehow, I lost my warning & error squiggles in Visual Studio. These are controlled in Options > Text Editor > C# > Advanced. Enable/disable them by using the Underline errors in the editor and Show live semantic errors checkboxes.

show-live-semantic-errors

Solution via visual studio – How to get rid of warning squiggles for WPP TraceEvent macro? – Stack Overflow.

Lenovo Caught Installing Adware On New Computers

Tsk, tsk Lenovo.

The adware, named Superfish, is reportedly installed on a number of Lenovo’s consumer laptops out of the box. The software injects third-party ads on Google searches and websites without the user’s permission.

via Lenovo Caught Installing Adware On New Computers.

Go To Implementation with View Call Hierarchy

Hands down, my favorite thing about ReSharper is that it adds Go To Implementation to the context menu for easy navigation to a function in a class that implements an interface. That’s kind of a wordy statement, so let me rephrase. Consider the example below. If I have a variable foo of type IFoo, ReSharper lets me right-click a call to foo.Bar() and jump directly to the implementation in either BasicFoo or ExtremeFoo.

interface IFoo
{
    public void Bar();
}

class BasicFoo : IFoo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("BasicFoo.Bar()");
    }
}

class ExtremeFoo : IFoo
{
    public void Bar()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("ExtremeFoo.Bar()");
    }
}

But what if you don’t have ReSharper? I used to think the next best option was Find All References, which does a good job of finding all the right places where you might want to look for an implementation. However, the implementations are mixed with the method itself and calls to the method, and the results returned by Find All References can become rather unruly.

find-all-references

Note that I said “used to think,” though. See that option under Find All References in the context menu, View Call Hierarchy? Use that. If you look at the Call Hierarchy for an interface method, you’ll get a group of implementations–exactly what I love about ReSharper’s Go To Implementation! You’ll also have a group of callers to the method which is what you get from another ReSharper nicety, Find Usages. Awesome.

call-hierarchy

Call Hierarchy is pretty amazing, and it’s kind of a bummer that I didn’t know about it until just now. Find All References still has its uses, but it’s taking a backseat to View Call Hierarchy in my toolkit. If you haven’t used it before, give it a shot–I bet you’ll love it, too.

Retrieving Properties from PSObject ExtensionData Using Reflection

Oh, PowerShell. Why do you do this to me? I run a query from your command line and see a bounty of properties, But, alas, when run from code, the properties that I expect are missing! Where could they be? ExtensionData? Ugh.

Now, it really seems like getting property values out of ExtensionData shouldn’t be so hard. It was difficult and annoying enough to me that I feel like I must be doing something wrong. If you know of a better way, please–PLEASE–let me know. Until then, I present to you a method for accessing the properties using reflection.

In this example, I’m essentially trying to access the following path of a PSObject:

psObject.ExtensionData.Value.Members
    .FirstOrDefault(x => x.Name == "propertyName").Value.Value

Things start off pretty straightforward. We want to get the ExtensionData property, which is included in the PSObject‘s Members collection.

var extensionData = psObject.Members["ExtensionData"].Value;

extensionData has its own Members collection, so we get that next. It’s not a public property, though, so we have to dig it out using reflection. Also note that we cast the object to an IEnumerable<object>

var members = extensionData.GetType()
    .GetProperty("Members", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
    .GetValue(extensionData) as IEnumerable<object>;

Things are starting to get a little trickier. We need to reflect on the members to find the property name that we’re looking for.

var memberType = members.First().GetType();
var nameProperty = memberType.Getproperty("Name", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
var member = members
    .Where(x => string.equals(propertyName, nameProperty.GetValue(x) as string, 
        StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
    .FirstOrDefault();

Now we’re in the home stretch, and we just need to get the property value. One caveat, though: the property is a data node, so you actually need to get its value. That’s right, we need Value.Value.

var valueProperty = memberType.GetProperty("Value", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
var value = valueProperty.GetValue(member);
valueProperty = value.GetType().GetProperty("Value", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
return valueProperty.GetValue(value) as string;

It got kinda gross in the end there, but mission accomplished. I found that the data types weren’t preserved in the extension data, so I had to return values as strings and cast to the appropriate data type (e.g., bool) outside my function.

Here’s the complete solution. (Error/null-checks omitted for brevity.)

string GetPropertyFromExtensionData(PSObject psObject, string propertyName)
{
    var extensionData = psObject.Members["ExtensionData"].Value;

    // members = extensionData.Members as IEnumerable<object>
    var members = extensionData.GetType()
        .GetProperty("Members", BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance)
        .GetValue(extensionData) as IEnumerable<object>;

    // member = members.Where(x => x.Name == propertyName)
    var memberType = members.First().GetType();
    var nameProperty = memberType.Getproperty("Name", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
    var member = members
        .Where(x => string.equals(propertyName, nameProperty.GetValue(x) as string, 
            StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase))
        .FirstOrDefault();

    // return member.Value.Value as string
    var valueProperty = memberType.GetProperty("Value", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
    var value = valueProperty.GetValue(member);
    valueProperty = value.GetType().GetProperty("Value", BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Instance);
    return valueProperty.GetValue(value) as string;
}

Visual Studio Fix: Intellisense Not Popping Up or Not Working « OmegaMan’s Musings

I was monkeying around with Resharper optimization and lost Intellisense altogether! Here’s how I got it back.

In quick launch type “Statement Completion” and choose the first one  “Text Editor -> All Languages -> General” to be taken to the options page for all languages.

On the general options page in the “Statement Completion” section override whatever is in the boxes “Auto list members” and “Parameter Information” and makes those checked. Such as shown here:

via Visual Studio Fix: Intellisense Not Popping Up or Not Working « OmegaMan’s Musings.

A caution about git branch names with ‘/’s

Git, you tricky bastard.

Let’s say I first create a branch named ‘wip/foo’:

git branch wip/foo

Git will create a file named ‘foo’ in the folder .git/refs/head/wip/. Now, suppose I attempt to create a new branch named ‘wip/foo/foo-offshoot’. git will return an error:

error: unable to create directory for .git/refs/heads/wip/foo/foo-offshoot
fatal: Failed to lock ref for update: No such file or directory

via coderwall.com : establishing geek cred since 1305712800.