Extra McNugget Sauce, Scope Control, and Expectations Management

One of the biggest challenges that my team faces when working with customers on a software development project is controlling scope. These projects begin with a contract followed by a formal requirements document that must be signed by the customer prior to beginning development work. We’re realistic about this process; we don’t expect that every requirement will be correctly identified upfront, and we’re willing to work with the customer throughout the development process to ensure that their needs are met.

Occasionally, we’ll find ourselves working with customers that keep pushing scope, little by little, until the project has been stretched so far beyond the original requirements that we’re not sure how we got there. Kudos to that customer for getting some serious bang for their buck, but at some point we, the development team, need to draw the line. The problem in a lot of these scenarios is that we’ve given and given and given with little or no resistance. We’ve set the expectation that if they ask for something, we’ll give it to them. We can find ourselves with a customer that’s unhappy about being cut off despite delivering a lot more than was originally bargained for.

This scenario has two major flaws. There’s obviously the issue of scope control, but expectations management for the customer is equally problematic.

I like to use a McNugget sauce analogy here. If you go to McDonald’s five times and get an extra sauce with your McNuggets for free, you’re happy. But then, on the sixth visit, maybe you get charged for the extra sauce because it’s the restaurant’s policy. This would upset a lot of people. “This is an outrage! I come here every Tuesday, and every time I get an extra sauce. I have never been charged for it before.” Rather than being happy about getting the extra sauce for free the first five times, they’re upset about not getting it for free the sixth time. However, if the McDonald’s employee were to let you know, “Hey, we’re supposed to charge for extra sauce, but I’ll let you have it for free this time,” then you’re less likely to feel like you’re being unjustly charged when you’re eventually asked to pay.

The same philosophy can be applied to our software development projects. When the customer makes that first seemingly innocuous, out-of-scope request, let them know that you’re doing them a little favor. “This request is out of scope, but I can see where it would be valuable. I’ll discuss this with the team to see if we can fit it in.” If you decide to do it, be sure to let them know that you’re making an exception this time. Finally, document that you gave them some “extra sauce” so that when/if you need to push back on a request, you can show them everything they’ve already gotten for “free.”

Getting back to the McNugget sauce analogy, some folks would still probably be upset about being made to pay even when they’ve been notified that they should be charged for the sauce they’re getting for free. “I know it’s not supposed to be free, but this is the first time I’ve ever been asked to pay. Get me the manager!” In response to that, I’d say an equally valid takeaway from this article is, “Do not give away [too much|any] extra sauce for free.”

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